Net Impact Q&A with Mitch Jackson on FedEx: Starting the Shift to Fuel-Efficient Vehicles

“It is not enough to be busy. So are the ants. The question is: What are we busy about?” - Henry David Thoreau

I have the privilege of speaking again at this year’s upcoming 2011 Net Impact Conference. In preparation for this, Net Impact, an international nonprofit organization that seeks to inspire and educate in creating a more sustainable world, interviewed me on some of the actions that FedEx is taking, why we’re doing so, and what the attendees should take away from it. The piece follows here:

Pinball Leadership

193155372-M.jpg “That deaf, dumb and blind kid sure plays a mean pinball” - The Who

You are standing there playing pinball. And, man alive! You are humming. The ball is hitting all the areas of the table you want and need. The bells are continually ringing and the score is zooming upward. You think that there’s nothing else you can do to be better here. You are beating this game. You are in the zone and as productive as the table will allow you to be.

In work, email feels like this sometimes, too. As soon as that email hits the inbox, you...

Yale Report Explores Environmental Impact of Trade

yale-study.jpg ...“One notable finding is that a subset of developing countries, such as China, India, and Mexico, have experienced trade growth while also decreasing their greenhouse gas emissions per unit of GDP.”

This is encouraging, and it tends to support the idea that trade, and the economic growth that goes with it, increases the capacity of countries to improve their environmental performance. It also reminds me of our work on Access, which includes a great deal of data analysis...

An Electrifying Idea: Where There’s A Will, There’s A Way

“It isn't what we don't know that gives us trouble, it's what we know that ain't so.” - Will Rogers

This nation’s energy policy for the past forty years is not that hard to judge - it’s disjointed, shortsighted and largely ineffective. We know it, we say it, but we continue to ignore it. It’s the “what we know that ain’t so.”

But, with turmoil in the world, and fuel prices on the rise - again, it’s well past time to continue ignoring it. We can’t afford to do so, either in our pocketbooks or in our security. It’s an energy policy of the past, not that of a once-again growing world economy that has become increasingly interconnected. We cannot let yesterday’s approach hamper tomorrow’s reality. As Will Rogers also said, “Never let yesterday use up too much of today.”